Autonomous Vehicles (Self-Driving Cars) will fundamentally transform mobility and usher in the next great leap in society.

Autonomous modes of transportation are used every day in cities around the world every day and with the introduction of autonomous vehicles usage will only grow. As the research around autonomous transportation has moved from the lab to the streets of the world, it’s impact has yet to be fully felt.

In the future individuals will subscribe to an autonomous vehicle brand as a service as opposed to owning and garaging an autonomous vehicle. Morgan Stanley is projecting the shared mobility market to be worth $2.6 trillion by 2030.To be prepared for this market opportunity, strategies have to be developed now.

Our insights into autonomous vehicles from the labs to the startups to the traditional car manufacturers are listed below in the form of articles for your perusal.

How Autonomous Driving will Impact the Wine Market

With fit-for-purpose autonomous vehicles, the Napa Valley wine market could have a greater than $50 billion impact on the U.S. economy.

Autonomous driving will impact many economic sectors – even some that you wouldn’t think of at first. In my opinion, the Californian wineries could be one of them. With changing demographics, growth of on-demand transportation and a decline in licensed drivers, the rise of driverless cars could hugely benefit the California wine country.

Fit-for-purpose autonomous vehicles would open up new business models while at the same drastically increasing safety. In the end, it could be a win-win situation for wineries and customers alike.

In the future, fit-for-purpose autonomous vehicles will be designed for individuals visiting California wine country. These vehicles will be designed to accommodate groups of individuals and will be complete with on-board dual temperature controlled wine storage.

Additionally, these autonomous vehicles will be able to provide an experience that is unique and tailored to each individual with their own bespoke wine itineraries. Through the in-car infotainment systems, passengers will be able to learn about the wineries and winemakers prior to arriving at the winery.

This is an experience that few individuals have indulged in as of yet, but millions of Americans aspire to, as an estimated 229 million cases of wine from California wineries shipped in the U.S in 2015. At the time of shipping the wine the U.S. wine market had an estimated retail value of $31.9 billion. Silicon Valley Bank is forecasting the worldwide sales growth in the range of 9 – 13% for the premium wine segment in 2016.

Along with the growth of premium wine sales comes a changing demographic of fine wine connoisseurs and collectors. By 2021, Generation X will surpass Baby Boomers as the largest fine wine connoisseur demographic in the U.S. By 2026, Millennials will surpass Generation X to become the largest fine wine connoisseur demographic.

The changing demographics of fine wine connoisseurs is perfectly timed to intersect with the decline in licensed drivers and the advancement of autonomous vehicles.

According to a University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute report, the percentage of individuals with a driver’s license decreased steadily between 2011 and 2014, while the U.S. population grew by 7 million during that timeframe.

For individuals aged 16 to 44, the number of individuals who have a driver’s license has decreased from 91.8% in 1983 to 76.7% in 2014. While at the same time, wine consumption in the U.S. has grown from 528 million gallons in 1983 to 886 million gallons in 2014.

The decline in driver’s licenses is offset by the rapid growth of on-demand transportation. An average of 7.3 million individuals in the U.S. use a ride sharing service each month which equates to $5.6 billion in annual spending.

With the rapid growth of ride sharing along with the increase in wine consumption, the perfect symbiotic relationship is being created for the wine market.

This symbiotic relationship is echoed by Matt Dees, winemaker of JONATA and The Hilt who stated, “With the changing demographics and introduction of autonomous vehicles specifically designed for visitors to California wine regions, an exceptional opportunity to safely and comfortably enjoy the best California has been created.”

Mr. Dees is correct in his assertion. With the increase in individuals opting not to drive, the trend of fit for purpose autonomous vehicles will rapidly increase. Wineries and winemakers such as Mr. Dees stand to benefit from this trend all the while increasing the safety of those individuals traveling on public roads.

McKinsey is projecting that up to one in ten cars sold in 2030 will be a shared vehicle which will lead to the subsequent rise of a market for fit-for-purpose mobility solutions.

McKinsey is correct in their projection, but the fit-for-purpose mobility solution will start to evolve in 2020 as society starts the great migration towards a fully autonomous future powered by A.I.

The mobility migration to fully autonomous vehicles will have a positive impact on the wine industry. Passengers in fully autonomous vehicles will be able to engage in deep conversations and consume fine wine while the vehicle is traveling to their destination.

For individuals visiting California wine country, fit-for-purpose autonomous vehicles will chauffeur wine connoisseurs from one tasting to another. These vehicles could be equipped with virtual reality headsets, which would allow passengers to experience the vineyard during harvest prior to arriving and tasting the wines. In-autonomous vehicle virtual reality experiences will allow wine tourists to build an emotional bond with the vineyards and wines prior to arriving.

Experiences as mentioned above will enhance the experience and eliminate the need to drive after a day of tastings will improve the safety of all individuals, not just those in the vehicle or traveling on the road. While improving safety, autonomous vehicles will also increase the amount of revenue that wineries could generate from their tasting rooms through increased sales.

Today, Napa Valley has a $50 billion economic impact on the U.S. economy.

Tomorrow, with fit-for-purpose autonomous vehicles designed for individuals visiting California wine country, Napa Valley could have an even a greater economic impact on the U.S. economy.

How Autonomous Driving will Impact the Wine Market is an article written by Brulte & Company Co-Founder Grayson Brulte that was originally published on Continental’s 2025AD.

Autonomous Vehicles powered by A.I. will eliminate uncertainty in traveling to and from Major International Airports

When autonomous vehicles are powered by artificial intelligence engines, individuals traveling to or from the world’s busiest airports will no longer experience uncertainty.

Jen-Hsun Huang, CEO of Nvidia, recently told the WSJDLive Conference that he would like his car to not just drive him to work, but to recognize who he is, set up his conference calls, and handle just about all the functions of a personal assistant.

In the near future, personal artificial intelligence engines will read your emails, create travel itineraries, and summon your autonomous vehicle—all without you having to ask. This knowledge, combined with real-time traffic and route data, will allow your personal artificial intelligence engine to pre-summon an autonomous vehicle for your journey to ensure that you arrive on time.

In particular, with the introduction of personal artificial intelligence (A.I.) engines and on-demand autonomous vehicles, the uncertainty of traveling to and from major international airports will be eliminated, and travelers will experience effortless commutes.

Anyone who has ever departed from a major congested airport knows that arriving on time is not always easy. If you are departing from LAX in Los Angeles, there is a good chance you will get stuck in traffic, as the average individual living in Los Angeles County spends 81 hours a year sitting in traffic.

In 2015, 75,690 vehicles per day entered Los Angeles International Airport’s central terminal area. Throughout that same year, more than 27.6 million vehicles entered the central terminal area, averaging out to roughly 4.3 trips per registered vehicle in Los Angeles County per year.

For departures, the autonomous vehicle will arrive at the airport within the passenger’s ideal amount of prep time, taking into consideration commute traffic, airport traffic, construction congestion, security lines, and flight delays. By operating in this manner, the artificial intelligence engine is eliminating the uncertainty of traveling to, and from, any of the world’s busiest airports.

Upon arrival at the airport, the artificial intelligence engine will automatically route the autonomous vehicle to the appropriate terminal and to the door which has the shortest TSA or pre-check security line.

Once the individual clears security and makes their way to the boarding gate, their personal artificial intelligence engine will push notifications to their smartphone based on their individual habits, such as reminders to purchase a bottle of water pre-flight.

Upon landing at their destination, an autonomous vehicle will be waiting outside the arrivals terminal and will track their location in real time to ensure the vehicle is conveniently waiting outside the appropriate exit door, all without a command.

In less than 20 years, when the frictionless travel experience described above becomes a reality, it will create tremendous value for travelers around the world who frequent the world’s busiest airports. The world’s busiest airport, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta saw an increase of 5.5% year-over-year passenger traffic which equated to a record-breaking total of over 100 million passengers in 2015.

To prepare for the continued increased in airport passenger traffic, we need leadership from forward-looking elected and appointed officials who will start planning for an autonomous future powered by artificial intelligence engines today.

The planning begins by having open, honest conversations with all stakeholders and designing autonomous drop-off and pick-up zones outside the arrivals and departures gates with conductive charging curbside.

From here, airport authorities can begin the process of fully integrating on-demand autonomous vehicles into their planning, which will enhance the overall experience for each and every passenger.

Autonomous Vehicles powered by A.I. will eliminate uncertainty in traveling to and from Major International Airports is an article written by Brulte & Company Co-Founder Grayson Brulte that was originally published on Futurism.

The Opportunities & Challenges of the Autonomous Vehicle Industry: Infrastructure

The recent death of a driver operating a semi-autonomous vehicle garnered widespread traditional and social media attention, and sent some worrisome shockwaves through the businesses and organizations serving this market niche. Factually, the Autonomous Vehicle industry is faced with both phenomenal opportunities and critical challenges.

The Opportunities

The market for partially and fully autonomous vehicles is projected to be worth $42 billion by 2025 and growing to nearly $77 billion in 2035 according to the Boston Consulting Group. With the growth of the market there will be opportunities and challenges for everyone with a vested interest in the future.

Autonomous vehicles will have an impact on every aspect of society, not just transportation. Our infrastructure will have to be upgraded as 65% of the roads in the U.S. are in poor condition. In California, which is the leader in autonomous vehicle technology, 68% of the roads are in poor condition.

This has provided opportunities for entrepreneurs such as Magic Johnson, who recently raised $1.3 billion for his JLC Loop Capital Partners infrastructure fund. As the U.S. Government is expected to invest $7 – $12 trillion in America’s infrastructure over the next 10 years, JLC Loop Capital Partners will be in a great position to bid on the RFPs and secure federal infrastructure contracts.

By 2020, you are likely to see the following developments as the Autonomous Vehicle market come to fruition as it relates to infrastructure:

    • Autonomous vehicle drop-off and pickup zones will start to become commonplace in cities across the United States.
    • The way in which we develop buildings will change as developers will begin to incorporate autonomous vehicles into the design and overall functionality of buildings.
    • Cities will start to deploy vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) technology for city owned and operate fleet vehicles.
    • Traffic signals and road sensors will be connected to secure networks owned and operated by the municipality to ensure smooth traffic flows as traditional cars and autonomous vehicles co-mingle on public roads.

The Challenges

For companies manufacturing autonomous vehicles, poor road conditions in the U.S. pose a challenge, as they have to develop cars that can operate in less than ideal conditions and are not depend on infrastructure.

Today, autonomous vehicles need to clearly see lane markings. In the future these vehicles will not have to see lane markings, as scientists at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory have developed a ground-penetrating radar system that achieves centimeter-level localization without the need of lane markings. This innovative system will allow manufacturers of autonomous vehicles to partially overcome the challenge of poor road conditions.

One of the less-visible, but not less critical challenges is crisis prevention and response. Crises will happen. Accidents. Serious business interruptions. Threats to reputation. Product defects and/or recalls. Failure of a crumbling infrastructure.

While some aspects of crisis prevention are technical and due to infrastructure, others involve vulnerability assessment and creation of a crisis management plan that incorporates both operational and communications response to crises.

Co-author and crisis management expert Jonathan Bernstein has found that 95% of the crises to which he has helped organizations respond were completely preventable if proper systems and plans had been in place.

As the infrastructure in the U.S. is upgraded and both partially and fully autonomous vehicles are deployed on public roads, it will be important for both autonomous vehicle manufacturers and Cities to have crisis management plans in place.

The future is bright for Autonomous Vehicle industry, but only if the industry properly understands the opportunities & challenges posed by the current infrastructure.

The Opportunities & Challenges of the Autonomous Vehicle Industry: Infrastructure is an article written by Brulte & Company Co-Founder and Co-Chair of the City of Beverly Hills Mayor’s Autonomous Vehicle Task Force Grayson Brulte and Jonathan Bernstein, President of Bernstein Crisis Management.

Jonathan has more than 30 years of experience in all aspects of crisis management — vulnerability assessment, planning, training and response.

Designing Stadiums for an Autonomous Future

Currently there are 58 stadiums and arenas around the world under construction. Not one of these stadiums or arenas has been designed for the future of transportation: shared on-demand autonomous vehicles.

One of the newest stadiums, the Minnesota Vikings’ new $1.1 billion U.S. Bank Stadium incorporates 1,300 Wi-Fi hotspots and a distributed antenna system—and not one autonomous vehicle drop-off and pickup zone. As of 2014, the median age of an NFL stadium that was replaced was 31 years. While the U.S. Bank Stadium was designed to last for 30+ years, the fan experience will decline rapidly and the stadium will become obsolete in less than five years due to the fact that autonomous vehicles were not included in the master plan. When the U.S. Bank Stadium turns 31, the year will be 2047. Shared autonomous vehicles will be commonplace, and the Minnesota Vikings will have spent millions of dollars retrofitting their stadium of the future for the future.

When the retrofitting begins, the parking lot sizes at the stadium will decrease as autonomous vehicles will not park on site. This newly found space will allow for the Vikings to create new fan experiences at the stadium such as “retro tailgating” and fan experience zones. These new experiences will not only offset the loss in parking revenue, but they will increase the revenue generated per square foot. During the retrofitting period, the team will lose millions of dollars on parking and lost fan experience revenue. This revenue lapse could have been avoided if the stadium was designed for the future of transportation.

Designing for the future is exactly what Prime Minister Shinzo Abe of Japan is doing for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. Prime Minister Abe is following the playbook developed by Prime Minister Eisaku Satō when he served as State Minister in charge of organizing the 1964 Summer Olympics. The 1964 Olympics took place just 19 years after World War II, which was catastrophic for Japan. To show the world Japan’s recovery, Japan Railways Group unveiled the high-speed Shinkansen (bullet train) to the world on October 1, 1964. Nine days later, the 1964 Olympics kicked off in Tokyo.

Fast forward to today and the new Shinkansen is the autonomous vehicle. Continuing the history of Japanese innovation, Prime Minister Abe recently addressed the Annual Meeting of the Science and Technology in Society Forum and stated; “I can tell you that in 2020 Tokyo, self-driving cars will be running around, and you will be able to use them to move about.”

With self-driving cars on the roads of Tokyo taking fans to and from the Olympic stadiums, we will look back in history and identity the 2020 Tokyo Olympics as the tipping point for incorporating autonomous vehicles into the design of stadiums.

Designing Stadiums for an Autonomous Future is an article written by Brulte & Company Co-Founder and Co-Chair of the City of Beverly Hills Mayor’s Autonomous Vehicle Task Force Grayson Brulte that was originally published on RealClearFuture.

An Autonomous Vehicle Could Save Your Life

Having a heart attack or a stroke in a car in the future does not mean near certain death as autonomous vehicles will soon be able to reroute you to a hospital.

In 2015, more than 38,000 people died in motor vehicle accidents according to the National Safety Council. 26% of these accidents lead to deaths that were caused by distracted driving. While the National Safety Council does not break out the number of motor vehicle deaths related to a medical condition, the risk is real.

4,110 heart attacks and strokes occur every single day in the United States, which equals roughly 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes per year. Drivers in the United States on average take 1.1 billion trips in their cars per day, which is four trips per day for every individual in the United States.

For roughly every 733 trips taken, a driver could experience a heart attack or stroke which would endanger their passengers and fellow drivers on the road as they could lose consciousness and control of the vehicle.

Today, this is one of the risks of driving on the road or being a passenger in a car. If a driver were to have a heart attack or a stroke, the chances of them losing consciousness and killing themselves, their passengers, pedestrians or an individual on a bike is very likely.

If the individuals do not parish in the accident and are injured, their necessitating emergency room visits, surgeries, rehabilitation and possible lifelong debilitating injuries could have a negative impact on their quality of life.

Tomorrow, these risks will be greatly reduced due to the introduction and widespread adoption of Level 4 autonomous vehicles. Not only will this risk be reduced, the chances of the passenger who has had a heart attack or stroke of surviving will greatly increase.

In the future autonomous vehicles will be able to sense behaviors such as the movement of passengers in the seats, body temperature or even noticing an increase in respiration.

If a passenger in an autonomous vehicle is feeling chest pain or numbness, they will be able to communicate with the autonomous vehicle through an intelligent voice system by simply saying a simple word or phrase such as “help”.

Through artificial intelligence and deep learning capabilities the autonomous vehicle would understand the problem partly due to the tone of the driver’s voice and could then send a message to the nearest hospital that the vehicle will be dropping off a passenger in distress.

The medical staff at the hospital would be able to track the location of the autonomous vehicle and communicate with the passenger if they are still conscious and coherent. If the passenger is coherent and communicative, they can even be instructed what to do as the autonomous vehicle drives them to the hospital.

Upon the vehicle’s arrival the hospital at a dedicated emergency autonomous vehicle drop-off and pickup zone, medical staff would be there waiting to take care of the passenger.

This is the future. A future with autonomous vehicles will save lives, improve mobility and lower the risk of dying while driving due to a medical emergency.

An Autonomous Vehicle Could Save Your Life is an article written by Brulte & Company Co-Founder and Co-Chair of the City of Beverly Hills Mayor’s Autonomous Vehicle Task Force Grayson Brulte and Dr. Peter D. Weiss, M.D. F.A.C.O.G, Co-Founder of Rodeo Drive Women’s Health Clinic and a former National Health Care Advisor to Senator John McCain’s Presidential Campaign in 2008 and Dr. Ben Carson’s Presidential Campaign in 2016.