Grayson Brulte

Grayson Brulte

@gbrulte | @gbrulte | @gbrulte

Grayson Brulte is an Innovation Strategist, Speaker, Author, Consultant, and Autonomous Vehicle expert.

Grayson is the Co-Founder / President of Brulte & Company, a consulting firm that specializes in designing innovation and technology strategies for a global marketplace. Grayson is also the Co-Founder of Autonomous Tomorrow.

Influential in Beverly Hills, he serves as the Co-Chair of the City of Beverly Hills Mayor's Autonomous Vehicle Task Force. He is also an active member of the city’s Smart City / Technology Committee which advises the Beverly Hills City Council on technology. In 2015, the City of Beverly Hills was chosen by Google as one of America’s digital capitals.

Along with his Beverly Hills guidance, Grayson was appointed a Global Health Economics Fellow at The University of Vermont College of Medicine.

From Autonomous Vehicles to politics, to the future of entertainment and more, Grayson has written articles about innovation, technology, and strategy for Continental’s 2025AD, General Electric Reports, the MIT Sloan Executive Education [email protected] Blog, RealClear Future, Futurism, VentureBeat and The Washington Times among others.

His written opinions and insights have been used by organizations such as the Consumer Electronics Association in presentations to the Federal Trade Commission.

Grayson has spoken in front of numerous audiences, including the FLDOT’s Florida Automated Vehicles Summit, New York International Auto Show, Princeton SmartDrivingCars, Consumer Telematics Show, XII Metropolis World Congress, TU-Automotive Detroit and Autonomous Vehicles Silicon Valley.

His comments have appeared in numerous publications, including The Financial Times, The Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, The Telegraph, The International Business Times and The Hollywood Reporter.

For speaking engagements, editorials and media enquiries please email [email protected].

The Futuristic Health Benefits Of Self-Driving Cars, Thanks To A.I.

In the future, self-driving cars won’t just prevent deaths from human error. An autonomous vehicle will reroute you to a hospital if a driver has a heart attack or a stroke, greatly increasing the chances of saving your life and others on the road.

Statistically, the inside of a vehicle is one of the most dangerous places for a human to be. Thanks to AI and its ability to sense a driver’s vital signs, it may become one of the safest.

In 2015, more than 38,000 people died in motor vehicle accidents per the National Safety Council. Of these accidents, 26 percent led to deaths that were caused by distracted driving.

Every day in the United States 4,110 heart attacks and strokes occur, or roughly 1.5 million every year. Drivers in the United States on average make 1.1 billion trips per day. This means that for roughly every 733 trips taken, one driver could experience a heart attack or stroke while behind the wheel.

This presents a real risk for everyone who gets into a car. If a driver does have a heart attack or a stroke, the chances of them losing consciousness and endangering themselves, passengers, other drivers or pedestrians is very likely.

These risks will greatly be reduced, if not eliminated, through the introduction and widespread adoption of level 5 autonomous vehicles. Today, we are already starting to see the benefits with semi-autonomous vehicles such as a Tesla.

This year, an individual driving on a highway in Missouri suffered a pulmonary embolism and manually rerouted the vehicle with autopilot to the hospital. The semi-autonomous autopilot feature saved the individual’s life, and in the future, fully autonomous vehicles will save a tremendous amount of lives.

This is just the first step. In the future, autonomous vehicles will be able to sense driver behaviors such body movement, temperature or even increases in respiration.

If a passenger is feeling chest pain or numbness, they will be able to communicate with their autonomous vehicle through an intelligent voice assistant by simply saying an easy word or phrase such as “help.”

Through artificial intelligence and deep learning capabilities, the autonomous vehicle would understand the problem (partly due to the driver’s tone and body movements) and could then send a message to the nearest hospital that a patient in distress is arriving soon.

The medical staff at the hospital would be able to track the location of the autonomous vehicle and communicate with the passenger. Upon the vehicle’s arrival at a dedicated emergency autonomous vehicle dropoff and pickup zone, medical staff would be there waiting to take care of the passenger.

Furthermore, since the autonomous vehicle took control of the wheel, other drivers and pedestrians on the road were not put at risk.

This is the future. A future with autonomous vehicles will save lives, improve mobility and lower risk while driving due to medical emergencies.

The Futuristic Health Benefits Of Self-Driving Cars, Thanks To A.I. is an article written by Brulte & Company Co-Founder Grayson Brulte that was originally published on GE Reports.

Autonomous Cars Are Coming, But Not For Your Job

With autonomous vehicles widely being considered one of the breakout innovations of 2016, the debate that autonomous vehicles combined with artificial intelligence will replace jobs is revving into high gear.

Largely this is a misnomer, as autonomous vehicles will create new jobs, job sectors and economic models.

The debate over innovations and technology replacing jobs is as old as history itself. During the first industrial revolution in 18th century England, new manufacturing processes and technologies were invented which led to the mechanization of textile production. This technical breakthrough led to the factory system; a system which would go on to create millions upon millions of jobs despite the worry that jobs would diminish due to automation.

In 2006, the technical breakthrough of cloud computing came from Amazon with the introduction of Elastic Compute cloud (EC2) as a commercial web service. IT professionals and industry analytics predicted large job losses as companies would outsource their computing needs. The opposite ended up being true, as cloud computing directly and indirectly created millions of jobs across the globe and tens of billions of dollars in wealth.

When Andy Jassy (who was Jeff Bezos first official shadow) wrote the AWS mission paper he said, “we tried to imagine a student in a dorm room who would have at his or her disposal the same infrastructure as the largest companies in the world.” The concept imagined by Mr. Jassy would eventually allow the founders of Airbnb to develop, launch, and scale Airbnb with the same infrastructure as the largest hotel companies in the world.

Since the company was founded in 2008, the hotel industry has cast a wary eye on Airbnb. From 2008 to 2015, Airbnb has supported hundreds of thousands of jobs, and hosts in the United States earned more than $3.2 billion in income. While in Europe, Airbnb hosts collectively earned more than $3 billion in 2015 alone.

Additionally, over the last five years, global hotel industry revenue has grown by more than $100 billion and supported hundreds of thousands of jobs.

Despite the negative publicity, Airbnb and the global hotel industry have complemented each other rather nicely. The same will be proven true with drivers and autonomous vehicles powered by artificial intelligence during the hybrid years.

The hybrid years is a term I am coining that describes the time period when both driver vehicles and autonomous vehicles are traveling on public roadways. During the hybrid years, the role of driver and logistics will merge into the role of autonomous logistics officers.

Autonomous logistics officers will manage fleets of vehicles from a remote command center in multiple daily shifts. When these roles merge, drivers’ quality of life will improve immensely. This new job category will create thousands of jobs for individuals with a new, unique skill set.

Individuals with this new skill are already in demand according to the Wall Street Journal as Amazon is looking to acquire or build an application capable of matching available trucks to shipments.

During the hybrid years – which are starting now – forward-looking entrepreneurs will successfully identify changing market dynamics and create new businesses which, in turn, will create new jobs. This is the very scenario that has played out time and time again throughout history.

This is already happening today with connected cars and software. Smart Car, RideCell and Otonomo are all developing software platforms to enable entrepreneurs and established companies to build applications and services on top of the connected car (autonomous vehicle).

The services currently being developed on these platforms will create jobs and income for hundreds of thousands of individuals. JPMorgan Chase calls this the platform economy. The JPMorgan Chase Institute estimates that between October 2012 and September 2015, 4.2 percent of adults, an estimated 10.3 million people — more than the total population of New York City — earned income on the platform economy.

During the hybrid years, the platform economy will continue to grow and provide jobs and income for millions of individuals. Following the hybrid years, technology will evolve to the point where vehicles will no longer be driven by human drivers and autonomous vehicles will no longer be managed by autonomous logistics officers.

At this point in history, and for the first time, society will rely on fully autonomous vehicles as our main source of transportation. History will once again repeat itself as new jobs and new sectors will be created. Most of these new sectors and jobs have not yet been imagined; however, they are coming. We just need to look back on history as a guide.

Autonomous Cars Are Coming, But Not For Your Job is an article written by Brulte & Company Co-Founder Grayson Brulte that was originally published on Futurism.

Why We Can Not Overregulate Autonomous Vehicles

To understand the future of autonomous vehicles, you first have to imagine a world where a child born today will never drive.

A child born today will be 16 in 2032. At the same time, 1 in 5 U.S. citizens will be a senior citizen, which will create an interesting paradigm of ages at a time when both age groups are historically prone to making mistakes behind the wheel.

In the future, these potential driving mistakes will not happen if elected officials do not make the mistake of overregulating autonomous vehicles and putting undue burdens on the industry and society.

In September, Chicago aldermen Ed Burke and Anthony Beale proposed an ordinance that would ban autonomous car development in Chicago’s city limits.

The ordinance sends a very loud and clear message that the City of Chicago is no longer open to innovation. Which is a shame, as the City of Chicago has a long history of innovations that went on to change the world. The vacuum cleaner, the zipper, the mechanical dishwasher and the cell phone were invented in Chicago.

Instead of proposing a restrictive ordinance, aldermen Burke and Beale should have shown a willingness to follow Chicago’s rich history of innovation and engaged in open and honest conversations with the autonomous vehicle industry.

Illinois State Transportation Secretary Randall Blankenhorn has shown this willingness. In a speech to the City Club of Chicago in November, Secretary Randall stated that his agency is speaking with companies that want to use autonomous vehicles to deliver goods.

Secretary Blankenhorn’s speech and attitude towards the autonomous vehicle industry is both symbolic and strategic. He is positioning the State of Illinois for the future of transportation and working towards increasing safety on the roadways of Illinois.

As of December 20, 2016, 1,035 individuals have perished in automobile accidents in the State of Illinois in 2016 alone. This is an increase of 115 deaths from 2015 and the first time since 2008 that the number has surpassed 1,000. Putting this number into perspective, roughly 20 individuals each week have perished in an automobile accident in the State of Illinois this year so far.

This is 1,035 too many individuals who have had their lives cut short due to traveling on the roadways. There are thousands of family members who have received the cruelest phone call possible. A call that has completely changed their lives for the worse.

In the short term, sadly I expect this number to continue to increase as the rate of distracted driving continues to increase. Individuals in the United States look at their devices over 8 billion times a day in aggregate, and that includes while behind the wheel.

Over 2.5 million individuals in the U.S. are involved in road accidents each year. 1.6 million of these accidents have a cell phone involved with them, equating to 64% of all road accidents in the United States.

Summing up the distracted driving problem in Illinois, Secretary Blankenhorn told The State Journal-Register; “Most of our problems come down to a couple of things. Avoid disruptions, whether it’s being on your cell phone or texting while you’re walking on busy streets. We see a lot of distractions.”

The Illinois State Police have stated the use of a cell phone while driving increases your chance of getting into a crash by 400%.

With the alarming data from the State of Illinois and the dramatic increase in distracted driving, we are at a tipping point with needing a solution. The solution is autonomous vehicles.

Autonomous vehicles do not get distracted, which allows passengers in the vehicle to continue looking at their devices without having to worry about operating a vehicle.

To get to this future – a future with zero deaths on our roadways – we can not allow regulation to slow down innovation. Slowing down innovation will undoubtedly lead to an increase in deaths on American roadways.

Instead, we need to allow innovation to take us to a future where we will never have to worry about our safety while driving on our roadways again.

We need to allow innovation to take us to a future where we will never have to worry if our children make fatal mistakes while behind the wheel.

Autonomous vehicles will take us to this future and keep our children safe if the innovations coming from the autonomous vehicle industry are not overregulated.

Together we can engage in open and honest conversations that will ultimately save lives and increase mobility for every single American.

Why We Can Not Overregulate Autonomous Vehicles is an article written by Brulte & Company Co-Founder Grayson Brulte.

How Autonomous Driving will Impact the Wine Market

With fit-for-purpose autonomous vehicles, the Napa Valley wine market could have a greater than $50 billion impact on the U.S. economy.

Autonomous driving will impact many economic sectors – even some that you wouldn’t think of at first. In my opinion, the Californian wineries could be one of them. With changing demographics, growth of on-demand transportation and a decline in licensed drivers, the rise of driverless cars could hugely benefit the California wine country.

Fit-for-purpose autonomous vehicles would open up new business models while at the same drastically increasing safety. In the end, it could be a win-win situation for wineries and customers alike.

In the future, fit-for-purpose autonomous vehicles will be designed for individuals visiting California wine country. These vehicles will be designed to accommodate groups of individuals and will be complete with on-board dual temperature controlled wine storage.

Additionally, these autonomous vehicles will be able to provide an experience that is unique and tailored to each individual with their own bespoke wine itineraries. Through the in-car infotainment systems, passengers will be able to learn about the wineries and winemakers prior to arriving at the winery.

This is an experience that few individuals have indulged in as of yet, but millions of Americans aspire to, as an estimated 229 million cases of wine from California wineries shipped in the U.S in 2015. At the time of shipping the wine the U.S. wine market had an estimated retail value of $31.9 billion. Silicon Valley Bank is forecasting the worldwide sales growth in the range of 9 – 13% for the premium wine segment in 2016.

Along with the growth of premium wine sales comes a changing demographic of fine wine connoisseurs and collectors. By 2021, Generation X will surpass Baby Boomers as the largest fine wine connoisseur demographic in the U.S. By 2026, Millennials will surpass Generation X to become the largest fine wine connoisseur demographic.

The changing demographics of fine wine connoisseurs is perfectly timed to intersect with the decline in licensed drivers and the advancement of autonomous vehicles.

According to a University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute report, the percentage of individuals with a driver’s license decreased steadily between 2011 and 2014, while the U.S. population grew by 7 million during that timeframe.

For individuals aged 16 to 44, the number of individuals who have a driver’s license has decreased from 91.8% in 1983 to 76.7% in 2014. While at the same time, wine consumption in the U.S. has grown from 528 million gallons in 1983 to 886 million gallons in 2014.

The decline in driver’s licenses is offset by the rapid growth of on-demand transportation. An average of 7.3 million individuals in the U.S. use a ride sharing service each month which equates to $5.6 billion in annual spending.

With the rapid growth of ride sharing along with the increase in wine consumption, the perfect symbiotic relationship is being created for the wine market.

This symbiotic relationship is echoed by Matt Dees, winemaker of JONATA and The Hilt who stated, “With the changing demographics and introduction of autonomous vehicles specifically designed for visitors to California wine regions, an exceptional opportunity to safely and comfortably enjoy the best California has been created.”

Mr. Dees is correct in his assertion. With the increase in individuals opting not to drive, the trend of fit for purpose autonomous vehicles will rapidly increase. Wineries and winemakers such as Mr. Dees stand to benefit from this trend all the while increasing the safety of those individuals traveling on public roads.

McKinsey is projecting that up to one in ten cars sold in 2030 will be a shared vehicle which will lead to the subsequent rise of a market for fit-for-purpose mobility solutions.

McKinsey is correct in their projection, but the fit-for-purpose mobility solution will start to evolve in 2020 as society starts the great migration towards a fully autonomous future powered by A.I.

The mobility migration to fully autonomous vehicles will have a positive impact on the wine industry. Passengers in fully autonomous vehicles will be able to engage in deep conversations and consume fine wine while the vehicle is traveling to their destination.

For individuals visiting California wine country, fit-for-purpose autonomous vehicles will chauffeur wine connoisseurs from one tasting to another. These vehicles could be equipped with virtual reality headsets, which would allow passengers to experience the vineyard during harvest prior to arriving and tasting the wines. In-autonomous vehicle virtual reality experiences will allow wine tourists to build an emotional bond with the vineyards and wines prior to arriving.

Experiences as mentioned above will enhance the experience and eliminate the need to drive after a day of tastings will improve the safety of all individuals, not just those in the vehicle or traveling on the road. While improving safety, autonomous vehicles will also increase the amount of revenue that wineries could generate from their tasting rooms through increased sales.

Today, Napa Valley has a $50 billion economic impact on the U.S. economy.

Tomorrow, with fit-for-purpose autonomous vehicles designed for individuals visiting California wine country, Napa Valley could have an even a greater economic impact on the U.S. economy.

How Autonomous Driving will Impact the Wine Market is an article written by Brulte & Company Co-Founder Grayson Brulte that was originally published on Continental’s 2025AD.

Autonomous Vehicles powered by A.I. will eliminate uncertainty in traveling to and from Major International Airports

When autonomous vehicles are powered by artificial intelligence engines, individuals traveling to or from the world’s busiest airports will no longer experience uncertainty.

Jen-Hsun Huang, CEO of Nvidia, recently told the WSJDLive Conference that he would like his car to not just drive him to work, but to recognize who he is, set up his conference calls, and handle just about all the functions of a personal assistant.

In the near future, personal artificial intelligence engines will read your emails, create travel itineraries, and summon your autonomous vehicle—all without you having to ask. This knowledge, combined with real-time traffic and route data, will allow your personal artificial intelligence engine to pre-summon an autonomous vehicle for your journey to ensure that you arrive on time.

In particular, with the introduction of personal artificial intelligence (A.I.) engines and on-demand autonomous vehicles, the uncertainty of traveling to and from major international airports will be eliminated, and travelers will experience effortless commutes.

Anyone who has ever departed from a major congested airport knows that arriving on time is not always easy. If you are departing from LAX in Los Angeles, there is a good chance you will get stuck in traffic, as the average individual living in Los Angeles County spends 81 hours a year sitting in traffic.

In 2015, 75,690 vehicles per day entered Los Angeles International Airport’s central terminal area. Throughout that same year, more than 27.6 million vehicles entered the central terminal area, averaging out to roughly 4.3 trips per registered vehicle in Los Angeles County per year.

For departures, the autonomous vehicle will arrive at the airport within the passenger’s ideal amount of prep time, taking into consideration commute traffic, airport traffic, construction congestion, security lines, and flight delays. By operating in this manner, the artificial intelligence engine is eliminating the uncertainty of traveling to, and from, any of the world’s busiest airports.

Upon arrival at the airport, the artificial intelligence engine will automatically route the autonomous vehicle to the appropriate terminal and to the door which has the shortest TSA or pre-check security line.

Once the individual clears security and makes their way to the boarding gate, their personal artificial intelligence engine will push notifications to their smartphone based on their individual habits, such as reminders to purchase a bottle of water pre-flight.

Upon landing at their destination, an autonomous vehicle will be waiting outside the arrivals terminal and will track their location in real time to ensure the vehicle is conveniently waiting outside the appropriate exit door, all without a command.

In less than 20 years, when the frictionless travel experience described above becomes a reality, it will create tremendous value for travelers around the world who frequent the world’s busiest airports. The world’s busiest airport, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta saw an increase of 5.5% year-over-year passenger traffic which equated to a record-breaking total of over 100 million passengers in 2015.

To prepare for the continued increased in airport passenger traffic, we need leadership from forward-looking elected and appointed officials who will start planning for an autonomous future powered by artificial intelligence engines today.

The planning begins by having open, honest conversations with all stakeholders and designing autonomous drop-off and pick-up zones outside the arrivals and departures gates with conductive charging curbside.

From here, airport authorities can begin the process of fully integrating on-demand autonomous vehicles into their planning, which will enhance the overall experience for each and every passenger.

Autonomous Vehicles powered by A.I. will eliminate uncertainty in traveling to and from Major International Airports is an article written by Brulte & Company Co-Founder Grayson Brulte that was originally published on Futurism.